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Nick Scheidies and Nick Tart

Savannah Britt was a published poet by the age of eight. By nine, she was hired as a paid reviewer of children’s books for The Kitchen Table News – a New Jersey newspaper with a readership of 70,000. But when that newspaper went under, Savannah was left unemployed at the tender age of 11.

Like any great entrepreneur, Savannah pulled herself up by her bootstraps. She started her own publication – a magazine called Girlpez – making her the youngest magazine publisher in the world. The magazine features coverage of events, like concerts and fashion shows, along with interviews from the likes of Shwayze, Kevin Rudolf, and Dawn from Dannity Kane.

Now 15, Savannah has guided her magazine as it has transitioned to an online-only format at Girlpez.com. She hopes to use her influence to strengthen girls and their communities.

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In January 2009, at the age of 15, Alex Fraiser used his web design know-how to start Blogussion, a blog about blogging. As the year went on, Blogussion thrived – bursting not just with insightful articles but also with an ever-growing, increasingly enthusiastic community of subscribers.

In January 2010, Alex and his business partner, 24-year-old Seth Waite, launched their first product – a web theme modeled after Blogussion’s unique style – to immediate success. With an Alexa ranking under 20,000, Blogussion is now the highest ranking blog by a 16-year-old on the Internet.

When Alex isn’t helping people around the world make their blogs as popular and profitable as possible, he’s just a normal high school junior in New Jersey. He lives with his family and enjoys camping, playing ping-pong, and cheering on the New England Patriots.

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Philip Hartman became an entrepreneur when he was eight-years-old. That’s when he started building slingshots that shot both BB’s and arrows.

Today, a home-schooled high school senior at the ripe age of fifteen, Philip spends most of his time cultivating two somewhat more advanced entrepreneurial ventures. One is a new system for fusing optical fibers that is cheaper, more efficient, and more dependable – an invention for which Philip won the 2008 Young Inventor of the Year award.

The other is called Steam Viper. It’s a device that emits steam onto a windshield and is capable of defrosting a frost-covered windshield in about 15 seconds.

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As a sixth-grader, Andrew Fashion and a pal figured out a way to transform their mechanical pencils into miniature rocket launchers.

Unlike most boys, they weren’t content merely using their invention to annoy teachers and fellow students. Instead, they started a business called Flaming Gold and handed out pieces of paper to their friends, advertizing their goods. It netted them a couple of dollars a day – until their school banned the pencils.

Fast forward to 2005. Andrew had dropped out of high school and was spending his time developing websites online. After months of just scraping by, Andrew hit it big with ad revenue from his website, MySpaceSupport.com. He was pulling in $100,000+ checks every month. But after a few years of living the high life, the money stream from the site dried up and Andrew went from being a millionaire to being in debt.

Keep Reading. Find out how Andrew spent all of his money…

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